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ON BEING A HERO…

Recently I’ve come across this video – “World Strongest Dad” about Team Hoyt: Rick, the son who has severe quadriplegia, and his father, Dick Hoyt. For nearly 30 years Dick Hoyt has been competing in marathons and triathlons together with his quadriplegic son, Rick, pushing his wheelchair or carrying him on his bike or even pulling him in a boat. Amazingly, in nearly 30 years of competing they never came last – always being ahead of some other runners!

It’s a wonderful story and the videos are really moving… and these gentlemen hold off the media hype very well – they are very real, true and sincere despite all the clichés framed upon them: “A Father of a century”; “World’s best Dad”; “Dick Hoyt, a Real Hero”…

I inserted a couple of videos here,  for sure you’ll find them inspiring…

 

However, I guess I wouldn’t be myself if I have just linked you to this great story without giving it a deeper thought…

A hero is a person who does something extraordinary and does it selflessly, but do you need to transform yourself into a super-athlete to run marathons and triathlons to be a true hero?

I think the lesson of Team Hoyt is deeper and broader than that…

Yes, indeed, there are people who become heroes because of a single extraordinary selfless act but this story is different.

Dick Hoyt started with a 5 mile charity run as an ordinary 37-year old but he went further year after year by pushing himself beyond the comfort zone day-in and day-out. That’s how Dick Hoyt achieved the extraordinary results – the marathons and triathlons – by stacking the micro-improvements of his daily training. He made this effort into a routine fueled by his desire to help his disabled son to express himself. It is the sustained effort of Dick Hoyt that I admire the most and I believe that gives all of us an incredible lesson.

What counts for the definition of a true hero is not a single act, however brave and self-sacrificing it is, but the ability to prevail over the complacency of everyday life, the ability to go outside the comfort zone day after day and week after week.

A single major deed that we usually visualize when thinking of heroes, is most often fueled by adrenaline that’s why I think that the ‘willpower' ‘everyday’ heroes are actually the greater ones.

We all have our highs and lows and the most difficult thing is to ‘stick to it’ – being able to grind through those emotional lows keeping the vision alive and doing these little daily things that bring us another step forwards.  

I do believe that this ‘everyday’ hero, although much less heralded, is of a much high caliber – and I am proud to say that I’ve been fortunate to meet and work with these real willpower heroes – you guys, the Special Parents…

You might not see it this way, considering your daily work with your special needs children as an ‘ordinary’ one ; but I can assure you that it is nothing but ‘ordinary’ – it is extraordinary…

You do it exactly as the humble willpower heroes do – “I just want to help my child to have a better life” – without ever thinking too much of it. Well, the story of Team Hoyt is exactly about this – the extraordinary achieved through ordinary daily mini-steps.

I hope that next time you look at yourself at the mirror and see a tired person there – raise your head higher , straighten your back and  broaden your shoulders – you deserve it…

And I hope that our work at ABR gives your life at least a little extra quality helping you to make these everyday achievements and steps forwards more realistic….

Thanks…

 

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